Water Management for Hydraulic Fracturing Forecasts Top $174 Billion

Water management investment for hydraulic fracturing is forecasted to average $17 billion per year from 2019 through 2028, according to new market forecasts from Bluefield Research. Emboldened by growing demand for scaling water supplies and disposal needs, a host of midstream water companies backed by private equity and sovereign wealth funds are positioned to seize the opportunity going forward.

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This Week’s Market Buzz

• Mammoth Energy Services has agreed to acquire frac sand mining company Taylor Frac and two oilfield service businesses for issuance of 7 million common shares. Based upon Mammoth Energy Services’ March 20 closing price of $19.06/share, the value of the transaction is $133.8 million, including the assumption of $7.3 million in debt. Mammoth Energy Services said it plans to…

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Frac Sand Market Projected to Expand

According to the study “World Industrial Silica Sand Market” by the Freedonia Group, although the hydraulic fracturing industry has struggled for the past year or so, it will remain the fastest growing market for silica sand on a global basis through 2020. Given silica sand’s importance in industrial applications, however, there are other stories about the mineral that are worth…

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EPA Claims Hydraulic Fracturing Impacts Drinking Water

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its scientific report on the impacts from hydraulic fracturing activities on drinking water resources, which provides states and others the scientific foundation to better protect drinking water resources in areas where hydraulic fracturing is occurring or being considered. The report, done at the request of Congress, provides scientific evidence that hydraulic fracturing activities…

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EOG Plans Big Drilling Increase

  EOG Resources will revise its hydraulic fracturing plans upward by 30 percent in 2016, despite the price of oil falling below the $40 per barrel mark. As reported by Oil and Gas Investor (OGI), the revised numbers from the Houston-based company indicate how strong shale companies, particularly those with heavy oil-reserve land, are surviving. Other firms have faltered en…

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