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Cabinet Secretaries Address Infrastructure

Five Cabinet secretaries on March 13 faced questions from the U.S. Senate on the administration’s principles of infrastructure investment, testifying before the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, reported the National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association.

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Georgia Construction Aggregate Association Trade Show Sets Record

The Georgia Construction Aggregate Association recently held its annual Management Workshop at the Cobb Galleria Centre in Atlanta. A record number of more than 600 plant management and industry executives turned out to hear programs built around the themes of safety, education, community relations and sustainability. 

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Construction Spending Flat in January

Construction spending during January 2018 was estimated at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1,262.8 billion, nearly the same as (±1.0 percent) the revised December estimate of $1,262.7 billion, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The January figure is 3.2 percent (±1.3 percent) above the January 2017 estimate of $1,223.5 billion.

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Construction Costs Rise in February

Construction costs escalated in February, driven by price increases for a wide range of building materials including steel and aluminum, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of Labor Department data. Association officials warned that newly imposed tariffs on those metals will create steeper increases that will squeeze budgets for infrastructure, school districts and commercial projects.

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New Report Finds Quarries Do Not Reduce Home Values

Sand, rock and gravel are literally the foundation of economic development, but their extraction process can generate dust, noise, vibration and truck traffic. While modern technologies and methods have greatly reduced quarries’ impact, the environmental and economic consequences of quarry operations receive considerable attention, often in the form of adversarial “not in my backyard” (NIMBY) campaigns. A key complaint is that quarries reduce home values.

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