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Company Loyalty Makes A Comeback


Company loyalty, the traditional bond between an organization and its employees, seems to be an obsolete concept in 2008. As the employment scene turns

NEAL LORENZI

Company loyalty, the traditional bond between an organization and its employees, seems to be an obsolete concept in 2008. As the employment scene turns more volatile, with manufacturers shrinking and folding and rapid technological advances driving endless change in the business world, company loyalty seems to be a thing of the past. This idea is reinforced in the public mind as downsizing, restructuring, outsourcing and similar initiatives are reported by the media on a regular basis.

While this scenario is not true across the board, many present-day employees are affected by mergers and acquisitions as well as the economic downturns of business in general. Layoffs, which are broadcast via the news media almost routinely, further erode the connection between employer and employee. These days, a company's best workers are likely to show more loyalty to their careers than to the organization.

That is why, given today's business climate, it was so refreshing to visit Tilcon New York's Clinton Point Quarry last month. Besides being a high-production operation that supplies aggregate to the building trade in New York City and Long Island, Clinton Point is remarkable for its strong sense of company loyalty. While interviewing several people at the plant, located near Poughkeepsie, N.Y., I felt a strong sense of family and teamwork emanating from everyone that I met.

Among its 120 union employees and management, there is a strong sense of continuity and pride at work at Clinton Point ó a strong sense of family. This can be traced back to the early 1900s, when the town of Camelot grew up around the plant. Since then, different generations of families have worked at Clinton Point. Many employees have known each other most of their lives. People tend to remain at the facility for their entire careers and encourage their children to join the workforce. Currently, 16 people are either second- or third-generation employees.

ìThere is real teamwork here and people seem to enjoy working together,î says Ed Daddona, who recently retired. ìInformation is passed on from generation to generation, from father to son.î Also, the company rewards good performance by promoting from within and giving employees the opportunity to learn additional skills. For example, Daddona joined the company in 1972, working third shift on the dock. He worked his way up and joined management in 1989, later serving as assistant plant manager and plant manager. ìI simply followed my father's advice ó learn everything you can.î

To read more about Tilcon New York's Clinton Point Quarry, this month's cover story, turn to page 20.

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