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Trending... by Mark S. Kuhar, Editor

Sept. 25, 2020 – California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that he has directed the state to ban gasoline-powered cars beginning in 15 years. The new executive order aims to eliminate...

ROCKtv

The VDG drum motor is a one-component conveyor drive design, which houses all moving parts inside the drum, eliminating the hazards posed by external drive parts, increasing operator safety, efficiency,...

Prime-Time Products

Sandvik Mining and Rock Technology released a new version of its Digital Driller operator training simulator, designed to allow the training of underground drill operators and maintenance personnel from anywhere.
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Manufacturers in Focus

Building on its 135-year legacy in Milwaukee, Komatsu Mining Corp. officially broke ground for its new state-of-the-art headquarters and manufacturing campus in the city's Harbor District on east Greenfield Avenue.
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The Strategist

by: Pierre G. Villere As we finish the third quarter of 2020, a year for the history books, I continue to puzzle over the dichotomy in the current American economy. In...

People on the Move

Eagle Iron Works (EIW) added Eric Tyree to its sales team. Tyree is responsible for EIW’s dealer and customer relationship building in the Eastern region of the United States.
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Rock Stars

Scott W. Parson received the 2020 President’s Award for Excellence from the Salt Lake Chamber in Utah. Parson is president of Staker Parson Materials & Construction and the Oldcastle Materials...
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Study: Methane Leakage from Shale Gas Lower Than Alleged


Initial findings from a new comprehensive study undertaken by the Environmental Defense Fund and the University of Texas found that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below estimates of previous studies.

In 2011, a study released from Cornell University led by ecologist Robert Howarth purported to show high levels of methane “leakage” from natural gas systems, including wells that had been hydraulically fractured. The Howarth study indicated that as much as 7.9 percent of natural gas developed from shale was leaking into the atmosphere thus negating its carbon-friendly advantages.

Studies since the release of the Howarth report have all tended to dispute or outwardly challenge the findings contained in the report. However, initial findings from the new study should leave little doubt.
The first part of the EDF study confirms the consensus reached by most scientists that methane leakage rates from natural gas systems were far below the estimates provided in the Howarth report. The study reviewed emissions associated with well development, production, and completions and found leakage of methane fell below estimates made by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The agency's most recent data found that overall leakage from the natural gas production process was actually below 1.5 percent.

Using their own writings, critics of the use of natural gas have claimed that leakage rates must fall below 2 to 3 percent in order to obtain any benefit from the use of natural gas. This report simply confirms USEPA's findings of leakage rates well below those found in the Howarth study and even below the thresholds set forth by critics of the natural gas industry.